Author Archives

Leslie Salas

writer - illustrator - editor - educator

[Not] Looking Like a Professor

The #ILookLikeAProfessor hashtag has been floating around the interwebs just in time for back-to-school season, and serves as a fresh breath for those of us in academia who might not look like we “belong.”

As Kelly J. Baker states in her article of the same title as the hashtag, “In popular culture and Google searches, professors are most often middle-aged, bespectacled, and bearded white men with a penchant for tweed.” But so many of us don’t fit that description.

This Girl Can: A Celebration of Women In Motion

Back-to-school often means back-to-sports. It’s a time to reconnect with old friends and meet new ones while engaging and challenging the body and mind. We play sports for the challenge, for fun, to stay fit, and/or because we couldn’t imagine doing anything else. However, not all women feel comfortable enough with their own bodies to get moving.

On Gender Bias in Student Evaluations

To continue our conversation about anonymous online professor rating systems, here’s a study on the massive sexist bias female academics must contend with. From the article “Female Academics Face Huge Sexist Bias – No Wonder There are So Few of Them” by Laura Bates: “Reviews of male professors are more likely to include the words ‘brilliant,’ ‘intelligent’ or ‘smart,’ and far more likely to contain the word ‘genius.’ Meanwhile, women are more likely to be described as ‘mean,’ ‘harsh,’ ‘unfair’ or ‘strict,’ and a lot more likely to be called ‘annoying’.”

Empty.

by Tia Jensen. “I was hungry. Ramen noodles were not available in Kentucky until I was in high school. Daddy would boil them for an hour, ’til they softened, expanded, swelled. He’d toss the water out, add spice last. Shared with four people, one packet never enough.”

Playlist- “The Long Run”

By Karen Lynch. “I know how to shoot to kill, but I can’t shoot a gun out of a man’s hand. Civilians always think cops can do that, but only Annie Oakley could have pulled off that sort of trick. I know how to stay married, but I don’t how to keep passion burning in a long marriage, and maybe I also view those who say they can as I do Annie, rare, unlikely, and highly skilled.”

Blue Canaries

My fiancé arrives home from a twelve hour shift. He left in the pre-dawn darkness, and has arrived after winter’s dusk.

“Who died?” I ask when I greet him at the door, motioning to the black band across his badge. A thin blue line on the band serves as a marker for his profession.

“The deputy in Leon Country,” he says, leaving his boots by the door. “You didn’t hear?”

“No,” I say. “What happened?”

He tells me about the fire and the ambushed deputies, and I’m reminded of the nickname firefighters have given cops–blue canaries.