Sister Sirens

This Girl Can: A Celebration of Women In Motion

Back-to-school often means back-to-sports. It’s a time to reconnect with old friends and meet new ones while engaging and challenging the body and mind. We play sports for the challenge, for fun, to stay fit, and/or because we couldn’t imagine doing anything else. However, not all women feel comfortable enough with their own bodies to get moving.

Too often women and girls are so often pressured into looking stick-thin, conforming to Barbie-like white standards of beauty while combating the Freshman 15. There is a damaging expectation that we must already be perfect. But we at The Gloria Sirens know better, and This Girl Can does, too. You’re already perfect the way you are, flaws and all. Embrace and love yourself.

For some solidarity, check out This Girl Can‘s awesome, inspirational video of women at their best: “a celebration of active women up and down the country who are doing their thing no matter how well they do it, how they look or even how red their face gets.”

This video is delightful in how well represented it is. Women of all shapes, colors, and abilities are featured and they are all beautiful. You are beautiful, too.

Cheers! What do you like to do to keep your body in motion?

Categories: Sister Sirens

1 reply »

  1. Reblogged this on Lisa Lanser Rose and commented:

    Studies have shown that one possible reason girls don’t perform as well as boys in math may be divided focus–girls may be preoccupied by their physical appearance, or “self-objectification.” In my own experience, I wasn’t objectifying myself so much as feeling anxious about how others might have been judging me. One way to reduce focus on appearance is to shift value from how your body looks to how well it’s cared for and what it can DO. Even incremental accomplishments (a few more reps, a little more speed, lower resting heart rate) can lower anxiety about how other people perceive you.
    http://www.researchgate.net/publication/13599647_That_Swimsuit_Becomes_You_Sex_Differences_in_Self-Objedification_Restrained_Eating_and_Math_Performance

We're listening--tell us what you think!